Online Program | New Ecologies: Landscapes

This interdisciplinary conversation brings together artists and scholars working across media and disciplines in dialogue around the topic of landscape. Through various lenses including the aesthetic, historical, experiential, and photographic, this conversation will consider the ways histories, presents, and futures—from climate change to colonialism—shape the way we see, and experience, land. Presented online via Zoom in conjunction with the exhibition Landmarks and moderated by Nina Pelaez, Curator of Programs and Interpretation.

Michael Kolster, Schuylkill Sojourn, Trinley Park, Linfield, Pennsylvania, 2013. Ambrotype framed and mounted to plexiglas. On extended loan from Karen Wells and Andrew Canning, Class of 1985. © Michael Kolster

Register for this free program here.

Panelists include:

Christine DeLucia is an assistant professor of history at Williams College. Her scholarship and teaching aim to build stronger understandings of Indigenous peoples–past and present–and the complex relationships communities have developed with place, heritage, and colonization. Her book “Memory Lands” was published in 2018.

Michael Kolster (’85) is a photographer, professor of art at Bowdoin College, and a 2013 John Simon Guggenheim Memorial Foundation Fellow in Photography. Work from his series on American rivers and appearing in his book “Take Me to the River” (George Thompson Publishing, 2016) is in the museum collection and on view as part of the Landmarks exhibition.

Julie Reiter (MA ’19) is a curator whose exhibition-making focuses on art that engages the senses. She served as the graduate curatorial intern for the “Landmarks” exhibition. Recently, Reiter helped organize “Sounds Lasting and Leaving” at Luxembourg & Dayan, where she now serves as Gallery Associate. Reiter received an MA in art history from the Williams Graduate Program.

Pallavi Sen is a professor of art at Williams College. As an artist, she works in installation, printmaking, textiles, Instagram, and intuitive movement. Some of her current interests include the inner lives of animals, farming and the artist as farmer, eco-feminism, domestic architecture, work spaces, rituals, alters, deities, pattern history, walking, and cooking. Some of her most recent work includes the building of a pollinator meadow and garden on the college campus.

July 30, 2020
7 PM

Online via Zoom

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